The Book of Ephesians: To God be the Glory. Part 2.

20 Now to him who is able to do far more abundantly than all that we ask or think, according to the power at work within us, 21 to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, forever and ever. Amen.” (Ephesians 3:20–21 (ESV)

Ephesians 3:20-21 brings the reader of this epistle to the conclusion of the letter’s first half. Chapters 4-6 will begin the application section being more practical in nature and content.

It should not be surprising that the Apostle Paul concludes the doctrinal section, much as he did in the Epistle to the Romans (Romans 11:33-36), with a doxology. A doxology is a verbal expression of praise and glorification to, and of, God.

The Apostle Paul begins his doxology with these words from Ephesians 3:20: “Now to him who is able to do far more abundantly than all that we ask or think, according to the power at work within us.” Paul then concludes his doxology with these words: “To him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, forever and ever. Amen.” Paul’s focus is completely upon the Lord. God alone is the subject of these two doxological verses.

To Him be glory. The subject remains the Lord. Glory (δόξα; doxa) means that which is praiseworthy, honorable and has amazing might.

The Scriptures speak of praise to His glorious name (Neh. 9:5), and describe Him as the glorious Father (Eph. 1:17) and the King of glory (Ps. 24). God is also exalted above the heavens, and His glory is over all the earth (Ps. 57:5, 11; 108:5; 113:4). He is the God of glory who appeared to the patriarchs of the OT (Acts 7:2). He is jealous to maintain his glory and unwilling that it be given to another (Is. 42:8). He acts to bring glory to himself (Ps. 79:9; Is. 48:11).

Additionally, the glory of God is proclaimed by the Creation (Ps. 19:1; 97:6; Rom. 1:20). God’s glory is also revealed by His mighty acts of salvation and deliverance (1 Chr. 16:24; Ps. 72:18–19; 96:3; 145:10–12; John 11:4, 40). His glory is the theme of the people’s praise (1 Chr. 16:24–29; Ps. 29:1–2, 9; 66:1–2; 96:7–8; 115:1; Is. 42:12; Rom. 4:20; Phil. 2:9–11).

The source of this praise to God is to be in the church as it has eternally been in Jesus Christ. This discipline of doxological praise is to be eternally continued throughout all generations. The addition of the word Amen means to emphasize the truth of all which the apostle has said.

Dr. R. C. Sproul writes, “In this letter, Paul uses a variety of images to describe the mutual relationship between the church and Christ: the body and the head (1:22-23), the reconciled and the reconciler (2:14-18; 4:1), and the bride and her groom (5:22, 33).”

Praise God from whom all blessings flow.

Praise Him, all creatures here below.

Praise Him above the Heavenly host.

Praise Father, Son and Holy Ghost.

Amen,

Soli deo Gloria!

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