I John: Confident Prayer.

14 And this is the confidence that we have toward him, that if we ask anything according to his will he hears us. 15 And if we know that he hears us in whatever we ask, we know that we have the requests that we have asked of him.” (I John 5:14-15)

What does it mean to have confidence in one’s prayer life? In other words, what does it mean to pray confidently?

The word confidence (παρρησία; parresia) means to have boldness or courage. This implies intimidating circumstances which require the believer to be bold and courageous. Synonyms include the words nerve, valor, daring, resolve and guts.

Within the context of today’s text, the believer in Christ may possess a boldness and courage when approaching God in prayer. This confidence is “that if we ask anything according to his will he hears us.”

To ask (αἰτώμεθα; aitometha) means to ask with urgency even to the point of demanding. It means to plead. The Apostle John writes that the believer in Christ has a boldness and a confidence to plead with God, even to the point of demanding, for what they need.

However, the caveat, or qualification, in such bold and confident prayer is that the believer is to ask according to the Lord’s will. This basic perspective in prayer is not new. Jesus taught the same principle in Matthew 6. Remember the phrase, “Thy will be done?”

The word will (θέλημα; thelema) refers to God’s intent, purpose and plan. Therefore, the individual who boldly and confidently prays to God must do so with an attitude of submission to the will of God. Man has a will and so does God. However, God’s will always is greater and more authoritative that the will of man.

The result of praying in such a manner is the promise that God hears our prayer. To hear (ἀκούει; akouei) means to listen and to respond. In other words, God pays attention to our prayers when we boldly and confidently approach Him in submission to His will and purpose. God always hears and responds to our prayers, even though His response will always be in accordance to His sovereign will for our lives.

Dr. John MacArthur writes, Christians can know with absolute confidence that God answers prayer when they approach the throne of grace (Heb. 4:16). This phrase (according to his will) constitutes a strategic key to answered prayer. To pray according to God’s will is to pray in accord with what he would want, not what we would desire or insist that he do for us (John 14:13–14). John already specified that answered prayer also depends on obedience to God’s commandments and avoidance of sin (1 John 3:21Ps. 66:18John 15:71 Pet. 3:7). Since genuine believers know God’s word (i.e., his will) and practice those things that are pleasing to him, they never insist on their own will, but supremely seek God’s desires (Matt. 26:39–42).”

Psalm 34:15-17 says, 15 The eyes of the Lord are toward the righteous and his ears toward their cry. 16 The face of the Lord is against those who do evil, to cut off the memory of them from the earth. 17 When the righteous cry for help, the Lord hears and delivers them out of all their troubles.”

An additional promise is found in vs. 15: “And if we know that he hears us in whatever we ask, we know that we have the requests that we have asked of him.”  The believer will receive what they ask God for because they are asking in light of God’s will in their lives. They want what God wants. What could be better. 

Our Lord hears our prayers. Therefore, we can boldly approach His throne of grace and find help in our time of need (Hebrews 4:15-16). Pray in such a way today.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

   

 

I John: The Purpose of the Epistle.

I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God, that you may know that you have eternal life. (I John 5:13)

Each book of the Bible has a particular purpose or theme. It may be joy (Philippians), the church (Ephesians) or forgiveness and reconciliation between fellow believers (Philemon).

The Apostle John clearly sets forth the Holy Spirit inspired theme of his first epistle. John writes, “I write these things to you.” This refers us to everything he has thus far stated. Even though he has more to say, he did not want the church to forget what he had previously written.

When He wrote, ““I write these things to you,” the apostle clarified who exactly the “you” he had in mind. His intended audience then, and now were those, “who believe in the name of the Son of God.” They are those who have placed their personal trust in, commitment to, dependence upon and worship and honor in Jesus Christ solely as Savior and Lord.

What does John want these believers to know? The purpose clause is stated at the conclusion of the sentence. “That you may know that you have eternal life.

 Again, the personal pronoun “you” are believers in Christ. To know (εἰδῆτε; eidete) means to not just possess knowledge about eternal life, but also to understand, to remember and to honor the Savior who provides the eternal life the believer possesses. This knowledge began at the point of conversion and has a continuing impact in the believer.

To have (ἔχετε; echete) means to presently and actively possess and to hold on to eternal life in Jesus Christ. Eternal life in Christ is not something the believer has to grasp as if just out of reach, but rather to possess as a gracious gift given by God which can never be lost or stolen.

Dr. John MacArthur writes, “Assurance of eternal life constitutes the first Christian certainty. While John wrote his Gospel to bring unbelievers to faith (John 20:31), he wrote the epistle to give believers confidence that they possessed eternal life. The false brethren’s departure left John’s congregations shaken (1 John 2:19). He assured those who remained that since they adhered to the fundamentals of the faith (a proper view of Christ, obedience, love), their salvation was sure. Eternal life does not refer primarily to a period of time but a person (5:20John 17:3). Eternal life is a relationship with the person of Jesus Christ and possessing his nature (as in 1 John 5:11–12).”

Meditate upon these wonderful words by the lyricist Fanny Crosby.

Blessed assurance, Jesus is mine
O what a foretaste of glory divine
Heir of salvation, purchase of God
Born of His Spirit, washed in His blood.

Perfect submission, all is at rest
I in my Savior am happy and blessed
Watching and waiting, looking above
Filled with His goodness, lost in His love.

This is my story, this is my song
Praising my Savior all the day long
This is my story, this is my song
Praising my Savior all the day long.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Sol deo Gloria!

 

LORD’S DAY 37, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 37 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Ten Commandments.

Q. But may we swear an oath in God’s name if we do it reverently?

A. Yes, when the government demands it, or when necessity requires it, in order to maintain and promote truth and trustworthiness for God’s glory and our neighbor’s good. Such oaths are grounded in God’s Word1and were rightly used by the people of God in the Old and New Testaments.2

1 Deut. 6:1310:20Jer. 4:1-2Heb. 6:16.
2 Gen. 21:24Josh. 9:151 Kings 1:29-30Rom. 1:92 Cor. 1:23.

Q. May we also swear by saints or other creatures?

A. No. A legitimate oath means calling upon God as the only one who knows my heart to witness to my truthfulness and to punish me if I swear falsely.1 No creature is worthy of such honor.2

1 Rom. 9:12 Cor. 1:23.
2 Matt. 5:34-3723:16-22James 5:12.

May God’s truth and grace reside here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

I John: Six Witnesses. Part 6.

11 And this is the testimony that God gave us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. 12 Whoever has the Son has life; whoever does not have the Son of God does not have life.” (I John 5:11-12)

John sets forth in I John 5:6-12 six evidences that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. The first four evidences are the Spirit, the water, the blood and God the Father. The fifth evidence to the identity of Jesus Christ is the believer’s own testimony of conversion. The sixth and final witness is the testimony of eternal life.

This sixth witness is not only tied to the first four, but also intricately to the fifth. The witness of eternal life corresponds to the Apostle John’s repeated emphasis about loving God and keeping His commandments.

Eternal life is not only a never-ending duration of life but also a unique quality of life. It is a holy life lived in the believer’s knowledge and awareness of God’s presence. It is seeking to be separate from sin’s power as God has delivered the sinner from sin’s penalty and will ultimately deliver the believer from sin’s presence.

Eternal life is centered in the person and work of Jesus Christ. It is the believer’s by grace alone, through God-given faith alone in Christ alone for the glory of God alone.

Dr. James M. Boice writes that, “Eternal life is not merely unending life. It is the very life of God. What we are promised in Christ is a participation in the life of the One who bears this testimony. This life is not to be enjoyed by everyone, however. This life is in Christ. Consequently, it is impossible to have (eternal) life without having Christ as it is impossible to have Christ without at the same time possessing eternal life.”

John 1:1-5 says, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not anything made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.”

I John 1:1-5 says, “That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we looked upon and have touched with our hands, concerning the word of life— the life was made manifest, and we have seen it, and testify to it and proclaim to you the eternal life, which was with the Father and was made manifest to us— that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you too may have fellowship with us; and indeed our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ. And we are writing these things so that our joy may be complete.”

John 14:1-6 says, Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many rooms. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, that where I am you may be also. And you know the way to where I am going.” Thomas said to him, “Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?” Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.

Eternal life is solely in Christ.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!    

I John: Six Witnesses. Part 5.

10 Whoever believes in the Son of God has the testimony in himself. Whoever does not believe God has made him a liar, because he has not believed in the testimony that God has borne concerning his Son. (I John 5:10)

John sets forth in I John 5:6-12 six evidences that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. The first four evidences are the Spirit, the water, the blood and God the Father.

The fifth evidence to the identity of Jesus Christ is the believer’s own testimony of conversion. This fifth witness is distinctively different from the previous four because it is an internal witness. It is the witness by the Holy Spirit within the heart or soul of the converted sinner.

When once the sinner rejected Christ, the converted praises and confesses Christ as Savior and Lord. Additionally, the believer seeks to live and be obedient to Christ. This occurs only by a supernatural new-birth or regeneration (John 1:1-3; Titus 3).

Romans 8:16 says, The Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God.”

Romans 10:9-10 says, because, if you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.10 For with the heart one believes and is justified, and with the mouth one confesses and is saved.

Galatians 4:6 says, And because you are sons, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!”

Dr. John MacArthur explains that, “It is the Holy Spirit’s work to confirm to believers their adoption as God’s children (see note on Rom. 8:15). Assurance of salvation is a gracious work of the Holy Spirit and does not come from any human source. Abba! Is an Aramaic term of endearment, used by young children to speak to their fathers; the equivalent of the word “Daddy.”

The Apostle John is not just pointing to historical evidence regarding the identity of Jesus Christ, but also of the believer’s present testimony of conversion. Both are necessary.

But what about the individual who can’t remember a particular point in time when they trusted Christ as their Savior and Lord. To them, they have always known Christ.

One commentator explains that, “Not knowing the exact moment you were converted does not mean you are not saved. A past experience can be helpful, but it is present-day testimony that provides confirmation and assurance that God wants you to enjoy and that your soul longs to have.”

Are you believing in Jesus Christ and only in Christ as your Savior and Lord? This confession becomes a blessed means of assurance that results in you proclaiming that Jesus is the Son of God.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

I John: Six Witnesses. Part 4.

“9 If we receive the testimony of men, the testimony of God is greater, for this is the testimony of God that he has borne concerning his Son.10 Whoever believes in the Son of God has the testimony in himself. Whoever does not believe God has made him a liar, because he has not believed in the testimony that God has borne concerning his Son. (I John 5:9-10)

John sets forth in I John 5:6-12 six evidences that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. The first three evidences are the Spirit, the water and the blood.

As we have often noted in reading the Scriptures observantly, words which are repeated occur so for emphasis. This is certainly the case in today’s text with the word testimony.

Testimony (μαρτυρίαν; martyrian) is a derivative of the familiar word testify, which we observed in I John 5:6-8. A testimony may refer to the content of a witness to an event or crime. It may also refer to the reputation of the witness. One’s verbal testimony may be contingent upon one’s behavior and reputation.

John argues that the verbal testimony and reputation of men pale in comparison to God. In other words, God’s testimony is greater than man’s in source, status and significance. It is a more reliable testimony because God cannot lie (Hebrews 6:18).

Therefore, John alleges that whoever does not trust in, commit to, depend upon and honor and worship Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord is in effect calling God a liar. This is the individual who does not believe what the Bible says about sin and salvation.

One commentator writes that “To reject Jesus as God’s Son is equivalent to charging God with perjury. It is that simple and John is that straightforward.” In other words, we cannot have belief in God if at the same time we do not have faith in Christ.

John Calvin writes, “God deserves to be believed much more than men. We can have no faith in God, except by believing in Christ, because God sets Him alone before us and makes us to stand in Him.”

How many times have people responded to your question of whether they have faith in Christ with the statement, “I believe in God.” John is saying that if you do not believe in Christ, you really do not believe in God.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

I John: Six Witnesses. Part 3.

6 “This is he who came by water and blood—Jesus Christ; not by the water only but by the water and the blood. And the Spirit is the one who testifies, because the Spirit is the truth. For there are three that testify: the Spirit and the water and the blood; and these three agree.” (I John 5:6-8)

Thus far, John’s epistle has been pretty straightforward. However, I have to confess that at first glance, I John 5:6-8 is a bit obscure in its meaning? What exactly is the apostle writing about when he refers to the water, blood and the Spirit?”

John sets forth in I John 5:6-12 six evidences that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. The first three evidences are the Spirit, the water and the blood.

To begin with, we have the witness of Jesus’ baptism. The word “water” (ὕδατος; hydatos) occurs four times in vs. 6-8. These four occurrences strongly indicate that John had the baptism of Jesus in mind.

The second witness is the blood. John uses this word three times. This particular word for blood in the Greek is αἷμα (haima). It can mean the blood of man or animals which refers to the seat of life.

The third witness is the Spirit. Each time the word Spirit is used in today’s text it is capitalized. This leads to the conclusion that the Apostle John is referring to the Holy Spirit, the third person of the Godhead.

John says the Spirit testifies or declares truth. John then gives us the reason why the Spirit testifies or declares truth: it is because the Spirit is the truth. The word truth (ἀλήθεια; aletheia) refers to that which actually happened or which is real.

John 15:26 says, But when the Helper comes, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth, who proceeds from the Father, he will bear witness about me.”

Dr. John MacArthur writes, “John no longer stresses apostolic testimony (1:1–4; 4:14) but writes of the testimony of God that comes through the Holy Spirit. Since the Spirit of God cannot lie, his testimony is sure. At the baptism of Jesus, the Father and the Spirit testified to the Son (see Matt. 3:16–17). The death of Jesus Christ also witnessed to who he was (Matt. 27:54Heb. 9:14). The Holy Spirit testified throughout Jesus’ life as to his identity (Mark 1:12Luke 1:35Acts 10:38).”  

As the arrow of a compass always points north, the Holy Spirit always points to Jesus. You may be sure that if a religious leader, or even a pastor, directs your attention to anyone other than Jesus Christ, this individual has the spirit of antichrist.

Take note of the religious leaders or programs you watch or of which you listen. What is their emphasis? Is it upon themselves or is it upon the person and work of Jesus Christ?

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

I John: Six Witnesses. Part 2.

6 “This is he who came by water and blood—Jesus Christ; not by the water only but by the water and the blood. And the Spirit is the one who testifies, because the Spirit is the truth. For there are three that testify: the Spirit and the water and the blood; and these three agree.” (I John 5:6-8)

Thus far, John’s epistle has been pretty straightforward. However, I have to confess that at first glance, I John 5:6-8 is a bit obscure in its meaning? What exactly is the apostle writing about when he refers to the water, blood and the Spirit?”

John sets forth in I John 5:6-12 six evidences that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. The first three evidences are the Spirit, the water and the blood.

To begin with, we have the witness of Jesus’ baptism. The word “water” (ὕδατος; hydatos) occurs four times in vs. 6-8. These four occurrences strongly indicate that John had the baptism of Jesus in mind.

The second witness is the blood. John uses this word three times. This particular word for blood in the Greek is αἷμα (haima). It can mean the blood of man or animals which refers to the seat of life.

However, in the context of today’s text, the word blood refers to the shedding of blood by violence. In other words, John’s reference to the testimony of blood refers to a slaying or murder. With respect to Jesus, the word blood refers to His crucifixion which provided a substitutionary atonement for sinners.

I Corinthians 2:1-2 says, “And I, when I came to you, brothers, did not come proclaiming to you the testimony of God with lofty speech or wisdom. For I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and him crucified.” The focal point of the Apostle Paul’s teaching, preaching and ministry was the cross of Christ.

Dr. R. C. Sproul says that, “Paul was saying that in all of his teaching, in all of his preaching, in all of his missionary activity, the central point of importance was the cross. In effect, this teacher was saying to his students that you might forget other things that I teach you, but don’t ever forget the cross because it was on the cross, through the cross, and by the cross that our Savior performed His work of redemption and gathered His people for eternity.”

How did God testify that Jesus was the Son of God with the shedding of His blood on the cross? There are several which the Gospels record. All of these evidences were unique events which occurred immediately during and after the crucifixion.

First, there was the darkness across the land from noon until 3:00 p.m. (Matthew 27:45). Second, the temple curtain was torn in two from top to bottom (Matthew 27:51). Third, there was an earthquake (Matthew 27:51). Fourth, God resurrected many Old Testament as an indication of the resurrection of life for all who trust in Jesus Christ (Matthew 27:52-53). There was even the testimony from the Roman Centurion that Jesus was the Son of God (Mark 15:39).

One commentator concludes that, “The cross says the King of Heaven has come down, and that God was in Christ reconciling the world unto Himself (2 Corinthians 5:21).  This is the true and biblical witness of our Lord’s crucifixion.”

Next time, we will study the witness of the Holy Spirit.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!    

 

 

I John: Six Witnesses. Part 1.

6 “This is he who came by water and blood—Jesus Christ; not by the water only but by the water and the blood. And the Spirit is the one who testifies, because the Spirit is the truth. For there are three that testify: the Spirit and the water and the blood; and these three agree.” (I John 5:6-8)

Thus far, John’s epistle has been pretty straightforward. However, I have to confess that at first glance, I John 5:6-8 is a bit obscure in its meaning? What exactly is the apostle writing about when he refers to the water, blood and the Spirit?”

John sets forth in I John 5:6-12 six evidences that Jesus Christ is the Son of God. The first three evidences are the Spirit, the water and the blood.

This takes us back to I John 4:1-6 with respect to testing the spirits to see if they are from God. John indicated in I John 4:2-3 that By this you know the Spirit of God: every spirit that confesses that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is from God, and every spirit that does not confess Jesus is not from God. This is the spirit of the antichrist, which you heard was coming and now is in the world already.

One commentator to today’s text explains that, “Christians can be certain that Jesus is God’s Son because God has provided several witnesses that testify to His divine nature, giving hope and assurance to God’s children.”

A key word contained in these verses is the word testify. It comes from the Greek Word μαρτυροῦν (martyroun) meaning to witness or to provide information about a person or an event. Both times when John uses the word it is in the present active format meaning that the witnesses regarding the identity of Jesus Christ is continual and never ending.

It is interesting to note that the Old Testament Law required “the evidence of two or three witnesses” to establish the truth of a particular matter (Deut. 17:6; 19:15; cf. John 8:17–181 Tim. 5:19). The Apostle John will ultimately provide six.

To begin with, we have the witness of Jesus’ baptism. The word “water” (ὕδατος; hydatos) occurs four times in vs. 6-8. These four occurrences strongly indicate that John had the baptism of Jesus in mind.

The account of the Baptism of Jesus is found in all four gospels (Matthew 3:13-17; Mark 1:9-11; Luke 3:21-23; John 1:29-34). It is that moment that Jesus was anointed for His three year public ministry.

Matthew 3:16-17 says, 16 And when Jesus was baptized, immediately he went up from the water, and behold, the heavens were opened to him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and coming to rest on him; 17 and behold, a voice from heaven said, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.”

The declaration attributed to God the Father is taken not only from Psalm 2:7 but also from Isaiah 42:1. The test reveals that Jesus Christ is truly the anointed Messiah and Servant of Yahweh who is King of kings. However, He would be a servant King who would suffer on behalf of sinners while on the cross.

When Jesus was baptized, He was identifying with the sinners He came to save. God the Father’s announcement in effect announces that Jesus was not just a mere man but also God in the flesh. As recorded in John 1:29, Jesus is the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.

When next we meet, we will examine the witness of Jesus’ crucifixion that He is the Son of God.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

 

 

 

 

LORD’S DAY 36, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 36 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Ten Commandments.

Q. What is the aim of the third commandment?

A. That we neither blaspheme nor misuse the name of God by cursing,1perjury,2 or unnecessary oaths,3 nor share in such horrible sins by being silent bystanders.4 In summary, we should use the holy name of God only with reverence and awe,5 so that we may properly confess God,6 pray to God,7 and glorify God in all our words and works.8

1 Lev. 24:10-17.
2 Lev. 19:12.
3 Matt. 5:37; James 5:12.
4 Lev. 5:1Prov. 29:24.
5 Ps. 99:1-5Jer. 4:2.
6 Matt. 10:32-33Rom. 10:9-10.
7 Ps. 50:14-151 Tim. 2:8.
8 Col. 3:17.

Q. Is blasphemy of God’s name by swearing and cursing really such serious sin
that God is angry also with those who do not do all they can to help prevent and forbid it?

A. Yes, indeed.1 No sin is greater or provokes God’s wrath more
than blaspheming his name. That is why God commanded it to be punished with death.2

1 Lev. 5:1.
2 Lev. 24:10-17.

May God’s truth and grace reside here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

I John: An Overcomer!

For everyone who has been born of God overcomes the world. And this is the victory that has overcome the world—our faith. Who is it that overcomes the world except the one who believes that Jesus is the Son of God?” (I John 5:4-5)

 What does it mean when the Apostle John says that those who have born of God have overcome the world? He uses the phrase “overcomes the world” three times in today’s text. Therefore, by the reality of such repetition, the Holy Spirit places great importance upon this truth.

In all three occurrences, the word “overcomes” is from the Greek word νικάω (nikao). In each instance it means to conquer, prevail, to be a victor, or to be victorious.

What is it that the believer in Christ, or those who have been born of God, have  overcome? John’s answer in each occurrence is the world.

The word world (κόσμος; kosmos) specifically refers to the fallen world systems of thought and behavior which is anti-God and rebellious towards God’s commandments. It is this meaning which we first studied in I John 2:15-17 which says, 15 Do not love the world or the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him. 16 For all that is in the world—the desires of the flesh and the desires of the eyes and pride of life[a]—is not from the Father but is from the world. 17 And the world is passing away along with its desires, but whoever does the will of God abides forever.”

And what is it that gives the believer in Christ the victory over the world as a victor? Is the individual believers’ faith. The victory over the world is through one’s trust in, commitment to, dependence upon and worship of Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. This is what John says in I John 5:5.

Dr. John MacArthur writes concerning the world that it is, Satan’s worldwide system of deception and wickedness. Through Christ and his provision of salvation, the believer is a victor (5:5) over the invisible system of demonic and human evil that Satan operates to capture men’s souls for hell. John repeats the reference to overcoming the world three times—to press it home. Faith in Jesus Christ and dedication of one’s life to him make one an overcomer. John repeats the truth for emphasis.”

When did Christ deliver you from the dominion of the world and make you an overcomer? Who do you know that is still under the domination of the world and needs for God to deliver them from the penalty, power and eventual presence of sin? Pray for those individuals today and thank the Lord that you are no longer like them.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!