The Apostle Paul: Prison Epistles; Philippians.

The Book of Philippians is the fourth and final Prison Epistle by the Apostle Paul. It received its name from the Greek city where the church was located. Philippi was the first town in Macedonia where Paul established a church (Acts 16:11-40). Paul’s authorship of Philippians has never been questioned.

When Philippians was written cannot be separated from the question of where it was written. The orthodox view is that Philippians, along with the other Prison Epistles (EphesiansColossians, Philemon), was written during Paul’s first imprisonment at Rome (c. A.D. 60–62). The most natural understanding of the references to the “imperial guard” (1:13) and the “saints . . . of Caesar’s household” (4:22) is that Paul wrote from Rome, where the emperor (Nero) lived.

The similarities between the details of Paul’s imprisonment given in Acts and in the Prison Epistles also argues that those epistles were written from Rome. For example, Paul was guarded by soldiers, (Acts 28:16; cf. Phil. 1:13–14); was permitted to receive visitors, (Acts 28:30; cf. Phil. 4:18); and had the opportunity to preach the gospel, (Acts 28:31; cf. Phil. 1:12–14Eph. 6:18–20Col. 4:2–4). Additionally, Paul’s belief that his case would soon be decided (Phil. 2:23–24) points to Philippians being written toward the close of the apostle’s two-year Roman imprisonment (c. A.D. 61).

My life’s verse(s) is contained in Philippians 2:12-13, which says, 1Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed, so now, not only as in my presence but much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling, 13 for it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure.”  

More to come.

I urge you to begin the Book of Philippians. Have a blessed day.

Soli deo Gloria!

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