Advent: The Song of Christ’s Preeminence: Conclusion.

15 He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross” (Colossians 1:15-20).

From Colossians 1:15-19 we have examined that Jesus is “the image of the invisible God, the first born over all creation, that by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him, Jesus is also before all things, and in him all things hold together. Additionally, He is the head of the body of Christ, which is the church along with being the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent.” Jesus also possesses all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell.”

Today, we arrive at the final verse in this stirring hymn concerning the preeminence of Jesus Christ. Colossians 1:20 says, “And through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross” The purpose of Jesus Christ incarnation 2,000 years ago was so that He would die on a cross and provide for sinners a substitutionary atonement by which regenerated sinners would be justified by grace alone, through faith alone, in the person and work of Jesus Christ alone, to the glory of God alone.

When the angel announced to the shepherds that Jesus had been born in the City of David, the angel said that Jesus was a Savior, Christ the Lord. After telling the shepherds where they could find the baby and His parents, the angel was joined with a multitude of the heavenly host who praised God saying, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!”

The sinner’s peace with God, which is the removal of enmity between the sinner and God resulting in reconciliation, is accomplished solely through the shed blood of Jesus on the cross. Jesus received from God the Father all of His wrath (Romans 1:18). Jesus’ death on the cross satisfied the righteous wrath of God so that God could be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus (Romans 3:21-26).

Romans 5:1 says, “Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. “

Dr. John MacArthur writes that, The Greek word for “reconcile” means “to change” or “exchange.” Its NT usage refers to a change in the sinner’s relationship to God. See Rom. 5:10 and 2 Cor. 5:18–21. Man is reconciled to God when God restores man to a right relationship with him through Jesus Christ. An intensified form for “reconcile” is used in this verse to refer to the total and complete reconciliation of believers and ultimately “all things” in the created universe (cf. Rom. 8:212 Pet. 3:10–13Rev. 21:1). This text does not teach that, as a result, all will believe; rather it teaches that all will ultimately submit (cf. Phil. 2:9–11). God and those he saved are no longer at enmity with each other.”

Remember the words, written by Charles Wesley, from the Christmas carol Hark! The Herald Angels Sing?

Hark! The herald angels sing,
“Glory to the new-born King!
Peace on earth, and mercy mild,
God and sinners reconciled.”
Joyful, all ye nations, rise,
Join the triumph of the skies;
With the’ angelic host proclaim,
“Christ is born in Bethlehem.”
Hark! The herald angels sing,
“Glory to the new-born King!  

Thank you Lord for reconciling this sinner, among many others, through the person and work of Jesus Christ.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

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