Advent: A Promise Made.

25:” Now there was a man in Jerusalem, whose name was Simeon, and this man was righteous and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was upon him. 26 And it had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not see death before he had seen the Lord’s Christ. 27 And he came in the Spirit into the temple, and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for him according to the custom of the Law, 28 he took him up in his arms and blessed God and said, 29 “Lord, now you are letting your servant depart in peace, according to your word; 30 for my eyes have seen your salvation 31 that you have prepared in the presence of all peoples, 32 a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and for glory to your people Israel.” (Luke 2:25–32)

Has anyone ever made you a promise? It doesn’t really matter what the promise may have been about.  The issue is that a promise was made. It may have been a trip to Dairy Queen, a birthday present request, or maybe a person who said to you “till death do us part.”  

Whatever promises you may have received, I’m sure some of them were broken. Whatever the reason, the individual in question did not keep their promise to you. How did you feel? Disappointed? Hurt? Angry? All of the above?

Did you trust them again when they made a promise to never break a promise? I suspect you were more than a little skeptical, and had already erected some emotional walls in order to insulate you from further hurt because of future broken promises.

In today’s text, we read about a man named Simeon. He is relatively obscure within the hallowed halls of God’s saints but Luke records some significant information about him.

First, Simeon was righteous. This means that he was in a right relationship with God. He was a man who God had justified by grace alone, through faith in the person and work of Jesus Christ alone, even though that work was still future for Simeon.

Second, Simeon was devout. He was a God-fearing, pious and reverent man. In other words, he not only was righteous in his standing before God, but he was also righteous in his behavior among his fellow man.

Third, Simeon was waiting for the consolation of Israel. What exactly does this phrase mean? The consolation of Israel refers to the mediator, helper and encourager God the Father would send in the person of the Messiah. The Messiah was coming on behalf of Israel. This Messianic title is taken from Isa. 25:9; 40:1–2; 66:1–11.

Fourth, The Holy Spirit was upon Simeon. He was supernaturally anointed by the Spirit of God even as all believers in Christ are today (Romans 8:9).

Finally, God had made Simeon a promise. It was a unique promise. No one else in all of Scripture had received such a promise from God.

What exactly was the promise God exclusively gave Simeon?  Luke 2:26 says, “And it had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not see death before he had seen the Lord’s Christ.”

Wow! That is some promise. The question is, did God keep His promise? The answer is, absolutely. As we shall soon see. God kept His promise then to Simeon as He keeps His promises to believers in Christ today.

Remember the words of this classic hymn.

Standing on the promises of Christ my King
Through eternal ages let his praises ring
Glory in the highest, I will shout and sing
Standing on the promises of God.

Standing, standing
Standing on the promises of God my Savior
Standing, standing
I’m standing on the promises of God.

Standing on the promises, I cannot fall
Listening every moment to the Spirit’s call
Resting in my Savior as my all in all
Standing on the promises of God.

Standing, standing
Standing on the promises of Christ my Savior
Standing, standing
I’m standing on the promises of God.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

 

 

 

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