LORD’S DAY 49, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 49 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Lord’s Prayer.

Q. What does the third petition mean?

A. “Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven” means:

Help us and all people to reject our own wills and to obey your will without any back talk. Your will alone is good.1

Help us one and all to carry out the work we are called to,2 as willingly and faithfully as the angels in heaven.3

1 Matt. 7:2116:24-26Luke 22:42Rom. 12:1-2Tit. 2:11-12.
2 1 Cor. 7:17-24Eph. 6:5-9.
3 Ps. 103:20-21.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

 

LORD’S DAY 48, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 48 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Lord’s Prayer.

Q. What does the second petition mean?

A. “Your kingdom come” means: Rule us by your Word and Spirit in such a way that more and more we submit to you.1 Preserve your church and make it grow.2

Destroy the devil’s work; destroy every force which revolts against you and every conspiracy against your holy Word.3 Do this until your kingdom fully comes, when you will be all in all.4

1 Ps. 119:5, 105143:10Matt. 6:33.
2 Ps. 122:6-9Matt. 16:18Acts 2:42-47.
3 Rom. 16:201 John 3:8.
4 Rom. 8:22-231 Cor. 15:28Rev. 22:17, 20.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

LORD’S DAY 47, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 47 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Lord’s Prayer.

Q. What does the first petition mean?

A. “Hallowed be your name” means: Help us to truly know you,1 to honor, glorify, and praise you for all your works and for all that shines forth from them: your almighty power, wisdom, kindness, justice, mercy, and truth.2 And it means, Help us to direct all our living—what we think, say, and do—so that your name will never be blasphemed because of us but always honored and praised.3

1 Jer. 9:23-2431:33-34Matt. 16:17John 17:3.
2 Ex. 34:5-8Ps. 145Jer. 32:16-20Luke 1:46-55, 68-75Rom. 11:33-36.
3 Ps. 115:1Matt. 5:16.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

 

LORD’S DAY 46, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 46 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Lord’s Prayer.

Q. Why did Christ command us to call God “our Father”?

A. To awaken in us at the very beginning of our prayer what should be basic to our prayer—a childlike reverence and trust that through Christ God has become our Father, and that just as our parents do not refuse us the things of this life, even less will God our Father refuse to give us what we ask in faith.1                                                                                   1 Matt. 7:9-11Luke 11:11-13.

Q. Why the words “in heaven”?

A. These words teach us not to think of God’s heavenly majesty as something earthly,1 and to expect everything needed for body and soul from God’s almighty power.2

1 Jer. 23:23-24Acts 17:24-25.
2 Matt. 6:25-34Rom. 8:31-32.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

 

LORD’S DAY 45, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 45 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Lord’s Prayer.

Q. Why do Christians need to pray?

A. Because prayer is the most important part of the thankfulness God requires of us.1 And also because God gives his grace and Holy Spirit only to those who pray continually and groan inwardly, asking God for these gifts and thanking God for them.2

1 Ps. 50:14-15116:12-191 Thess. 5:16-18.
2 Matt. 7:7-8Luke 11:9-13.

Q. What is the kind of prayer that pleases God and that he listens to?

A. First, we must pray from the heart to no other than the one true God, revealed to us in his Word, asking for everything God has commanded us to ask for.1 Second, we must fully recognize our need and misery, so that we humble ourselves in God’s majestic presence.2 Third, we must rest on this unshakable foundation: even though we do not deserve it, God will surely listen to our prayer because of Christ our Lord. That is what God promised us in his Word.3

1 Ps. 145:18-20John 4:22-24Rom. 8:26-27James 1:51 John 5:14-15.
2 2 Chron. 7:14Ps. 2:1134:1862:8Isa. 66:2Rev. 4.
3 Dan. 9:17-19Matt. 7:8John 14:13-1416:23Rom. 10:13James 1:6.

Q. What did God command us to pray for?

A. Everything we need, spiritually and physically,1 as embraced in the prayer
Christ our Lord himself taught us.

1 James 1:17Matt. 6:33.

Q. What is this prayer?

A. Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come. Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And do not bring us to the time of trial, but rescue us from the evil one.* For the kingdom and the power and the glory are yours forever. Amen.1**

1 Matt. 6:9-13Luke 11:2-4.

*This text of the Lord’s Prayer is from the New Revised Standard Version in keeping with the use of the NRSV throughout this edition of the catechism. Most biblical scholars will agree that it is an accurate translation of the Greek text and carries virtually the same meaning as the more traditional text of the Lord’s Prayer
**Earlier and better manuscripts of Matthew 6 omit the words “For the kingdom and … Amen.”

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

 

LORD’S DAY 44, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 44 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Ten Commandments.

Q. What is the aim of the tenth commandment?

A. That not even the slightest desire or thought contrary to any one of God’s commandments should ever arise in our hearts. Rather, with all our hearts we should always hate sin and take pleasure in whatever is right.1                                                                   1 Ps. 19:7-14139:23-24Rom. 7:7-8.

Q. But can those converted to God obey these commandments perfectly?

A. No. In this life even the holiest have only a small beginning of this obedience.Nevertheless, with all seriousness of purpose, they do begin to live according to all, not only some, of God’s commandments.2                                                                           1 Eccles. 7:20Rom. 7:14-151 Cor. 13:91 John 1:8-10.
2 Ps. 1:1-2Rom. 7:22-25Phil. 3:12-16.

Q. Since no one in this life can obey the Ten Commandments perfectly, why does God want them preached so pointedly?

A. First, so that the longer we live the more we may come to know our sinfulness
and the more eagerly look to Christ for forgiveness of sins and righteousness.1 Second, so that we may never stop striving, and never stop praying to God for the grace of the Holy Spirit, to be renewed more and more after God’s image, until after this life we reach our goal: perfection.2

1 Ps. 32:5Rom. 3:19-267:7, 24-251 John 1:9.
2 1 Cor. 9:24Phil. 3:12-141 John 3:1-3.

May the Lord’s truth and grace be found here.

Soli deo Gloria!

 

 

LORD’S DAY 40, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 40 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Ten Commandments.

Q. What is God’s will for you in the sixth commandment?

A. I am not to belittle, hate, insult, or kill my neighbor—not by my thoughts, my words, my look or gesture, and certainly not by actual deeds—and I am not to be party to this in others;1 rather, I am to put away all desire for revenge.2 I am not to harm or recklessly endanger myself either.3 Prevention of murder is also why government is armed with the sword.4

1 Gen. 9:6Lev. 19:17-18Matt. 5:21-2226:52.
2 Prov. 25:21-22Matt. 18:35Rom. 12:19Eph. 4:26.
3 Matt. 4:726:52Rom. 13:11-14.
4 Gen. 9:6Ex. 21:14Rom. 13:4.

Q. Does this commandment refer only to murder?

A. By forbidding murder God teaches us that he hates the root of murder: envy, hatred, anger, vindictiveness.1 In God’s sight all such are disguised forms of murder.2

1 Prov. 14:30Rom. 1:2912:19Gal. 5:19-211 John 2:9-11.
2 1 John 3:15

Q. Is it enough then that we do not murder our neighbor in any such way?

A. No. By condemning envy, hatred, and anger God wants us to love our neighbors as ourselves,1 to be patient, peace-loving, gentle, merciful, and friendly toward them,2 to protect them from harm as much as we can, and to do good even to our enemies.3

1 Matt. 7:1222:39Rom. 12:10.
2 Matt. 5:3-12Luke 6:36Rom. 12:10, 18Gal. 6:1-2Eph. 4:2Col. 3:121 Pet. 3:8.
3 Ex. 23:4-5Matt. 5:44-45Rom. 12:20-21 (Prov. 25:21-22).

May God’s truth and grace reside here.

Soli deo Gloria!

LORD’S DAY 39, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 39 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Ten Commandments.

Q. What is God’s will for you in the fifth commandment?

A. That I honor, love, and be loyal to my father and mother and all those in authority over me; that I submit myself with proper obedience to all their good teaching and discipline;1 and also that I be patient with their failings—2 for through them God chooses to rule us.3

1 Ex. 21:17Prov. 1:84:1Rom. 13:1-2Eph. 5:21-226:1-9Col. 3:18-4:1.
2 Prov. 20:2023:221 Pet. 2:18.
3 Matt. 22:21Rom. 13:1-8Eph. 6:1-9Col. 3:18-21.

May God’s truth and grace reside here.

Soli deo  Gloria!

 

LORD’S DAY 38, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 38 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Ten Commandments.

Q. What is God’s will for you in the fourth commandment?

A. First, that the gospel ministry and education for it be maintained,1 and that, especially on the festive day of rest, I diligently attend the assembly of God’s people2 to learn what God’s Word teaches,3 to participate in the sacraments,4 to pray to God publicly,5 and to bring Christian offerings for the poor.6 Second, that every day of my life I rest from my evil ways, let the Lord work in me through his Spirit, and so begin in this life the eternal Sabbath.7

1 Deut. 6:4-9, 20-251 Cor. 9:13-142 Tim. 2:23:13-17Tit. 1:5.
2 Deut. 12:5-12Ps. 40:9-1068:26Acts 2:42-47Heb. 10:23-25.
3 Rom. 10:14-171 Cor. 14:31-321 Tim. 4:13.
4 1 Cor. 11:23-25.
5 Col. 3:161 Tim. 2:1.
6 Ps. 50:141 Cor. 16:22 Cor. 8 & 9.
7 Isa. 66:23Heb. 4:9-11.

May God’s truth and grace reside here.

Soli deo  Gloria!

 

LORD’S DAY 37, 2019.

On each Lord’s Day this year, we will display the 52 devotionals taken from the Heidelberg Catechism which are structured in the form of questions posed and answers given.

The Heidelberg Catechism was originally written in 1563. It originated in one of the few pockets of Calvinistic faith in the Lutheran and Catholic territories of Germany. Conceived originally as a teaching instrument to promote religious unity, the catechism soon became a guide for preaching as well.

Along with the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dordt, it forms what is collectively referred to as the Three Forms of Unity.

The devotional for LORD’S DAY 37 is as follows. Please take note of the biblical references given in each answer. This morning’s devotional addresses The Ten Commandments.

Q. But may we swear an oath in God’s name if we do it reverently?

A. Yes, when the government demands it, or when necessity requires it, in order to maintain and promote truth and trustworthiness for God’s glory and our neighbor’s good. Such oaths are grounded in God’s Word1and were rightly used by the people of God in the Old and New Testaments.2

1 Deut. 6:1310:20Jer. 4:1-2Heb. 6:16.
2 Gen. 21:24Josh. 9:151 Kings 1:29-30Rom. 1:92 Cor. 1:23.

Q. May we also swear by saints or other creatures?

A. No. A legitimate oath means calling upon God as the only one who knows my heart to witness to my truthfulness and to punish me if I swear falsely.1 No creature is worthy of such honor.2

1 Rom. 9:12 Cor. 1:23.
2 Matt. 5:34-3723:16-22James 5:12.

May God’s truth and grace reside here.

Soli deo Gloria!